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Federal Rules of Evidence with Cues and Signals for Good Objections

Publisher: NITA

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ISBN: 9781601565389
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Knowing the technical bases for objections is not so difficult. Law school covers that. What is much harder is recognizing a good objection very quickly when your opponent puts a question to a witness or starts using a document.

This handy guide identifies the "cues" to listen for when your opponent asks a question or the witness gives an answer. These words or phrases that are the "cues" that tell you instantly that you likely have a good objection. When you know the cues, you can object rapidly and successfully. For documents, this guide also provides the "signals" that support a useful objection. For example, many lawyers miss the objection to "lay opinion" when the writer of a document gives his own view of why something happened.

Cues and Signals gives you details on every objection that has been recognized in federal courts and sorts out the high-payoff objections from those of lower priority for both oral testimony and exhibits. Everything you need on objections is in one compact volume.

Table of Contents

CONTENTS

Introduction:   Basic Stuff-Read This
       What This Book Covers
       How the Material Is Organized
       Four Important General Points that Apply Throughout

Part 1:   Recognizing Good Objections to Oral Testimony
       Higher Priority versus Lower Priority
       Content versus Form
       Listening to Questions
       Listening to Answers

Generally Higher Priority Objections to Questions by Counsel
       Four Important Objections to the Content of Questions
       Four Important Objections to the Form of Questions
       Four Important Objections to Subject Matter Excluded by the Rules
       Five Important Objections to Lack of Foundation for the Question

Generally Lower Priority Objections to Questions by Opposing Counsel
       Eleven Other Objections to the Content of Questions
       Other Lower Priority Objections to the Form of Questions

Objections to Witnesses' Answers to Questions
       Answers: Focusing on Higher Priority Objections
       Answers: Lower Priority Objections

Part 2:   Recognizing Good Objections to Exhibits
       Objections to the Foundation for Exhibits
       Objections to the Competence of the Witness
       Objections to the Identification of the Exhibit
       Objections to the Relevance or Materiality of the Exhibit
       Objections to the Authentication of the Exhibit

Objections to the Content of Exhibits
       Four Generally Higher Priority Objections to the Content of Exhibits
       Four Objections to Excludable Content in an Exhibit
       Twelve Generally Lower Priority Objections to the Content of Exhibits

Part Three:   Recognizing Other Specialized Objections at Trial
       Objections to Opening Statements
       Objections to Judicial Notice
       Objections to Presumptions
       Objections to Closing Arguments, Summation

Appendix A:   Federal Rules of Evidence, December 2014